Portuguese WEST AFRICA – Angola

Our sleuth Pemberton checked the alleys and boulevards of Oxford, London, and, once, Kopenhagen, in his quest to capture rare species for us during 1938-1957, after which he seems to have lost his camera!     This London photo has come out so poorly that we can hardly read the plate at all, but print it we must, as it is perhaps the only example of Angola ‘plates-on’  we will ever see from that single-letter  period (Series 1, 1930 to 1950s).    Note  that the numbers seem not to be separated by the Portuguese dashes –  L – 7234.     Can you read it?*

The vehicle is a Nash Ambassador of a model which ran from 1942 (production commenced 1945), to 1949.

L 7234 from Luanda in 1940s London.  No international oval, but a cast-alloy AM}ANGOLA surmounts the plate.

L-7234 from Luanda in 1940s London.     No international oval, but  a cast-alloy                                             ANGOLA surmounts the plate.    Now see below.    Pemberton archive

~~

March 2013.  This is the remarkable result of special editing by Antonio Barragan of Placamundi.   He thus brings to light an image of a very rare plate indeed - L-7234 Angola.    Pemberton archive.

*March 2013. This is the remarkable result of special editing by Antonio Barragan of Placamundi. He thus brings to light an image of a very rare plate indeed – L-7234 Angola.              Pemberton archive.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Below:     The only Angolan ever seen in Britain by the Kettering  team was this Borgward  Isabella Kombi (station-wagon) in 1958.   Though the letters ‘PAN’ for the international oval had been allocated to Angola,  only the Portuguese ‘P‘ was ever seen.    The Angolan area coded here by the letter ‘T‘ has never been discovered**.      The status of Angola from 1951 altered from a Colony to an Overseas Province of Portugal, and Portugal itself was then governed by the dictatorship of Antonio Salazar.    A bit of a mess, one way and another…..

Some time during the late 1950s, this next plate series (National series 2) had been introduced,  now comprising three letters – the first always ‘A‘, then a letter  for the registration district, and a serial letter, followed by two numbers, a dash, and two numbers (in the traditional Portuguese way), all serial.     So this car, ATE 01-69, was from Angolan area T, car no. E 169.    ‘T’ must have been a remote, low-registry zone (see new data below).  

ATE 01-69 in 1958 Kensington, London.

ATE 01-69 in 1958 Hyde Park Gate, Kensington, London.   The good-quality  German  Borgward Isabella was produced from 1954 to 1962.     Brumby archive

Many expatriates fled the long civil war which ensued after the 1973 Independence, and for a time, there were a few evacuees’ Angolan plates to be seen in Europe – mostly in Portugal, of course – but this Mazda made it to Paris in 1976.   As usual, its international oval ties it to European Portugal, not to the ephemeral ‘PAN’.

a 1976 escapee from the civil war, gat his car to Paris.   Regional code A was for Luanda, the capital.

AAD 70-12    A 1976 escapee from the civil war, got his car to Paris.      Regional code A was for Luanda, the capital.    Brumby archive.

Below:     A recent technical aid visitor to Angola,  to mop up the millions of landmines, was Peter Renwick, who passed us these pictures of the international efforts to restore the ruined country.    The green plates are given to International Agencies who import aid vehicles duty-free, perform their allotted tasks and re-export them, or pay some duty and leave them behind for re-registration.

designed to dispel explosions under the truck, these specialist vehicles are given duty-free import status during their project.

Designed to dispel explosions under the truck, these specialist 4wd vehicles are given duty-free temporary import status during their Angola project.   LD=Luanda.                  Brumby archive via Peter Renwick

Angolan Autoroute A1.

LBA-33-38     Angolan Autoroute A1.     Scratched Russian ZIL truck.         Newly-unemployed driver.   c.2002.   LB=Lobito.             Brumby archive.

We can get an idea of mine-clearance from these photos from 2008.

We can get an idea of mine-clearance and equipment from these 2008 photos. Brumby archive via Peter Renwck

(ANG3)(0tax)KK.Menongue-CC mines removed_resize (ANG4)_LD-17-12-AE_comp_VBpr_resize (ANG3)(0tax)_vario_VBpr (ANG3)(0tax)_LDI-42-55_comp_VBpr

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