Caribbean Offers

April 8, 2014

The Masterpieces Sotheby’s couldn’t handle!

Quentin Henderson, long-term member, apiarist, plateman and oddfellow, cannot join us at Thierhaupten at Easter, because, naturally, he is walking across America.

But to ameliorate our dolour at his absence, he has very sportingly sent some rare plates for the auction, which we hold to swell Club funds and ensure a luxury retirement for those who have held the Europlate Presidential chain of office.

Here they are, as they have arrived by post; I have not cleaned them, but they are in good order, with just a whiff of rum detected when one holds them directly to the nose.

(K&N)_P 5924_c_QH2014

P 5924  —  1969-99 were the years of issue of the plain ‘P’ plates for Private vehicles on Kitts & Nevis.     Prior, the Islands used ‘CN’ (Christopher and Nevis).

(K&N)_P 4829_c_QH2014

P 4829 — Private vehicle, Kitts & Nevis, plate via Quentin Henderson.

PA was first issued in 1997

P 9999 was issued and PA was first issued in 1997

(NA-Eu 99)_E-487_cu_QH2014

E – 487  —  Of the Dutch Antilles, the most unusual are Saba and ‘Statia’.     Quentin’s haul from Sint Eustatius was was taken on a day trip he took there some years ago. (He may have swum over to it from Nevis – the history of his acquisitions is given at the obverse of all his auction plates.)         Formerly part of the Netherlands Antilles, Sint Eustatius became a special municipality within  the Netherlands on 10 October 2010.    The name means ‘a good place to settle’.     And a good place to have a plate from!

(K&N)_CD 07_cu_QH2014

CD 07  —  Here is a true oddity.   Saint Christopher and Nevis is a Commonwealth Realm, whose sovereign is that of the United KIngdom.    I had not thought that such a status warranted diplomatic representation by foreign embassies and that The Federation of   ‘Kitts & Nevis’ might not even need embassies in such a tiny place.           However, Quentin produces this remarkable CD plate, showing salt-erosion evidence that it has been out and about there for quite a time.    Yellow on blue is the idiosyncratic colour-set for the West Indies CDs (though nowhere else) -= so that’s OK, – but why a leading zero, for goodness’ sake????     Only St. Kitts applies leading zeroes……    There could be some hot bidding for this Extremely Rare Plate…..     Thank you Quentin!       JULY 2015 – The plate never made it to Thierhaupten as planned, and was therefore not auctioned.    Held over until 2016……..

(Mon)_M 551_c_QH2014

M 551  —  A delight to see this characteristic font, which applies only to Montserrat, where still, many/most plates are painted on any old piece of steel/alloy sheet. This was captured on Nevis, from a car which changed islands.

(Mon)_M 1494_c_QH2014

…. as was this……

See some of you at Thierhaupten at Easter!


Anguilla (Eel) Island, Br.Leeward Is.

April 7, 2013

The remarkable (and first) sighting of a vehicle outside its own border, from the tiny island territory of Anguilla,  was made in central London in 2011.    It sported the new plate design and an international oval never dreamt-of – AXA !    At least one other Europlate member saw it in ensuing weeks, and interviewed the driver, who told him that  he had brought this car and other Porsches back to Britain several times over the years!  (evidence, please)     If so, the membership had missed his visits!

This and other Anguillan photos from a 1981 visit to the 88 sq. km. British Overseas Territory of 1300 citizens, follows:

The Porsche 940 V-8, perhaps the most unlikely candidate for use on a sandbank.

The Porsche 928S, perhaps the most unlikely candidate for use on a sandbank.    Brumby archive

Snazzy modern design to replace one of the world's simplest commenced in 1997.    P1641 represents the Private vehicle taxation class, which are azure blue, black and white.

A Snazzy modern design to replace one of the world’s simplest, commenced in 1997.     P1641 represents the Private vehicle taxation class, which are azure blue, black and white.    Brumby archive

Though not allocated an international oval, Anguilla is coded on the International List and this owner has taken that for his oval.   Keen chap.

Though not allocated an international oval, and its ISO code is AI, Anguilla must be coded AXA on some list and this owner has taken that for his oval. Keen chap.       See new data below-Comments-D.Wilson

(ANG2)_P 1641_VB2011.2_resize

The most up-to-date systems have been introduced to control the few registrations which exist on this tiny, quiet, low-lying isle.

The most up-to-date systems have been introduced to control the few registrations which exist on this tiny, quiet, low-lying isle.

In December  1981, when the writer visited, and long before the technicolour plate revolution of 1997, Anguilla was using painted plates, often on plywood backing, there being so little steel or aluminium material from which to make up plates.    Often they were painted  direct on the old vehicles.    A plate I acquired there, A 402 (no photo), was painted on the obverse of a Gibraltar pressed-alloy from a VW which had been imported therefrom.

a typical painted woden plates on a Morris Marina, the worst British car ever made.

1980S: A typical painted wooden plate A 1216,  on a Morris Marina, the worst British car ever made.

These BMC Farina Austins and Morrises were shipped all over the world and stood up well to tough conditions, often as taxis.    This one was approaching its end of its life at the petrol pump in The Valley, the main settlement.   Brumby archive

These BMC Farina Austins and Morrises were shipped all over the world and stood up well to tough conditions, often as taxis – as did the similar-looking  Peugeot 404s.    This one, A 14,  was approaching the end of its life at the petrol pump in The Valley, the main settlement, in 1981.   In 1980, Anguilla had seceded from its former uneasy union with St. Christopher, Nevis and Barbuda.        Brumby archive

Odd thoiugh it seemed, this plate on the islands' smartest car, was attributed to the Governor  when seen in 1981 in The Valley.   Unusual for a British Resident  to use a non-British car in those days.....   Brumby Archive

Odd though it seemed, this (wooden) plate 1 G on the islands’ smartest car, an  Oldsmobile, was attributed to the Governor when seen in 1981 in The Valley.  RPWO gives it that between 1980 and ’85, the authority on the island was vested in ‘Her Majesty’s Commissioner’  who bore the plate ‘HMC’.    As an aside, it was unknown for a British Resident to use a non-British car in those days – and this is a Left-hand-drive ‘foreign’ car selected for Right-hand-drive Anguilla – very odd….. Brumby archive

A.18, which would have first been issued in about 1915, is seen on a then-modern Japanese Datsun 120Y, indicating that Anguilla registrations were re-issued when voided.   See also A 14.    The 'A' series had reached the 1400s in Dec. 1981.

A.18, which would have first been issued in about 1935, is seen on a then-modern (1991) Japanese Datsun 120Y, indicating that Anguilla registrations were re-issued when voided.  See also A 14.  The ‘A’ series had reached the 1400s in Dec. 1981, though there was no evidence of so many vehicles.    Brumby archive

A handful of motor dealers in Anguilla were issued Trade registrations in this format, which they made up themselves, as witness D 13.  Brumby ArchiveA handful of motor dealers in Anguilla were issued Trade registrations in this format, which they made up themselves, as witness D 13. Brumby archive

Another strange photo capture was the P-suffix plate on this redundant crane on Anguilla.    The suffix had been unknown and we have taken it to abbreviate Plant (heavy equipment).    Nothing similar has been seen or reported; this may have been the only one.

Another strange photo capture was the P-suffix plate on this redundant crane on Anguilla. The suffix had been unknown and we have taken it to abbreviate Plant (heavy equipment). Nothing similar has been seen or reported; this may have been the only one.  Brumby archive

ANGUILLA LEADS THE WAY

The system of  suffix letters to differentiate vehicle classes is a simple and clever one.   When the registration status of a vehicle changes, such as the withdrawal of a car from a hire fleet, the suffix letter ‘R’  is removed from the plate and the normal Private plate is now on show – or, the addition of a new ‘T’ converts the car to a Taxi.      Why such a remote place as Anguilla should have originated such a practical scheme is indeed a compliment to someone in a back office.

Trinidad uses something similar, but their vehicle class is the leading letter on their plates (T-AH/P-CF, R-BB etc.) rather than the final letter which seems somehow tidier to the writer.     Most countries of the world use a variety of significantly more complicated or costly methods to split up their national fleets in to types – to the delight of codebreakers everywhere and of Herr Utsch’s bankers.

Another bright idea on Anguilla was to use the A prefix rather than a simple numeral.    Many of the British Caribbean territories commenced licencing with a number-only registration, so that there was no differentiation between the territories.    Then most added a ‘P’ for Privately-owned vehicle and that didn’t help either!     The Administrator on St. Kitts, Nevis, Barbuda and Anguilla had the wit to impose codes CN & A.

The Anguillan registration number is given to the owner and not to the vehicle, so that he may retain his first licence-plate for use on a succession of cars.    This can account for the many low numbers still seen in circulation in 1991.

When did the suffix-letter idea begin in Anguilla?     It was never used in St. Kitts & Nevis, with its CN prefix, to which Anguilla had been politically bound from the beginning of motoring until 1980.    Was it running its own suffix system during the St. Kitts years, and if so, when did it start?      Indeed, how necessary was it to even employ differentiated plates on an island where there were so few vehicles and everyone knew whose car or moped was passing each day?    It was always one of their cousins!     And so we wonder about the past……..


Confuse-a-spotter

December 7, 2011

Most of the territories which Britain managed in the earlier years of the 20th. century were given registration systems firmly anchored in the design and layout of the Construction and Use regulations of the home country.     As a result, far-flung places could have identical plates and an early spotter relied on the vehicle carrying an international oval at the back, if it travelled outside its own land.

The most prolific type was the letter ‘P’ (which usually stood for Private vehicle-but not always) followed by up to four numbers.     First, though, are three  ‘AY’  examples, all still legally circulating in their respective countries.     First, Turkish Northern Cyprus, AY 255.

Turkish Northern Cyprus AY 255

Then, AY 230 – Alderney, Channel Isles (GBA)
Alderney, Channel Isles - AY 230

and Hong Kong (HK) ( a  re-issue, as AY 995 is quite old now, on a new car.)
Hong Kong AY 995

No identifying ovals, unfortunately, but I do remember where I took the pictures!

~~~~~~~

Perhaps the most confusing set of identical plates was issued in the Windward Islands.    One had to chase the car and interview the driver to obtain the island of issue, as they hardly ever carried an international oval….

GRENADA (WG) on an MG TD in Newmarket, GB in 1964. P 2734

1972 photo of an Austin 1300 in London, from Barbados, where P codes the parish of St. Philip.

1972 photo of a Morris 1300, P 475, in London, from Barbados, where P codes the parish of St. Philip.

 

P 2909 - the original series for Antigua.

P 2909 – the original series for Antigua.

St. Kitts & Nevis went on to P and numbers, when it had exhausted its original CN prefix (Christopher & Nevis)   1980 picture by Vic Brumby on St. Kitts.

P 335 – St. Kitts & Nevis went on to P and numbers, when it had exhausted its original CN prefix (Christopher & Nevis).   1980 picture on a Rover 90, by Vic Brumby on St. Kitts.

St. Vincent, the rarest of the W set of Windward Islands, seen in London in 1969, and still the only one ever.    The owner had to be stopped and asked, to learn the island of source.    Peugeot 404 - Brumby archive.

St. Vincent, the rarest of the W set of Windward Islands, (WV, WG, WL & WD) seen in London in 1969, and still the only one ever. The owner had to be stopped and asked, to learn the island of source.   Months later, P 2277 was found parked in a far distant part of London, ad a photo grabbed – Peugeot 404 – Brumby archive.

Trinidad used up to P 9999 long ago, but still re-issue as cherished plates if needed.    That's what this one is.    P 6000, taken there in 1987 by VB.

Trinidad used up to P 9999 long ago, but still re-issue P as cherished plates if needed. That’s what this one is. P 6000, taken there in 1987 by VB.   Black on white indicates taxi licence, as with Mauritius below.

Bermuda is not far away, though not in the West Indies, and used the same P system.   The motorbike shows P 1936 and was photo'din  the early 1950s.

Bermuda is not far away, though not in the West Indies, and used the same P system. The motorbike shows P 1936 and was photo’d
in the early 1950s.

P 135 is from distant Mauritius, where the white background shows it to be a taxi - a Hillman Minx, shot by VB in Port Louis, 1980s.

P 135 is from distant Mauritius, where the white background shows it to be a taxi – a Hillman Minx, shot by VB in Port Louis, 1980s.

 

Northern Rhodesia allocated 'P' code to Lusaka and Mumbwa and Reg Wilson capured P 1106 in Britain in 1961.

Northern Rhodesia allocated ‘P’ code to Lusaka and Mumbwa and Reg Wilson captured P 1106 in Britain in 1961.

P 5373 was issued to Penang as a Straits Settlement in Malaya  in the1920s - and this Ford Anglia was photographed there as recently as 2012!

P 5373 was issued to Penang as a Straits Settlement in Malaya in the1920s – and this Ford Anglia was photographed there as recently as 2012, by Douglas Fox!

France kept the enclaves of Pondichery and Karikal in Madras State, South India, tagging the vehicles there in the P and K series.     This Cadillac P 1452  has survived the obligatory change to white Indian plates, when this photo was taken.   Thanks to Cedric Sabine.

France kept the enclaves of Pondichery and Karikal in Madras State, South India, tagging the vehicles there in the P and K series, using the British-style font of India. This Cadillac P 1452 had survived the obligatory change to white Indian plates, when this photo was taken. Thanks to Cedric Sabine.

 

P 8825 - Similarly , French Tahiti sometimes used British-style plates for the original series of up to four numerals followed by a 'P' for Privé.   VB photo in Papeete, 2002.

P 8825 – Similarly , French Tahiti sometimes used British-style plates for the original series of up to four numerals followed by a ‘P’ for Privé.        VB photo on a Land Rover in Papeete, 2002.

END (Unless you know otherwise????