CD symbol on Chinese and Taiwanese plates

January 19, 2013

More on John Pemberton’s possible China 1940s  diplomat.

03-0524 PRC CD

03-0524 PRC CD

MR(?) 172 remains unexplained for now……

 

Further to the March 2013 Post  ‘Fancy a Chinese?‘  and the subsequent identification of the Chinese character on the shield, Alex Kavka sends the Blog the Chinese ideogram for ‘ambassador’, on his Taiwan diplomatic photo 359.    It is the same as that of the current PRC diplomatic corps (not necessarily ambassador)  ideogram 01-718 and another 1972-4 Taiwanese dip. 1 50 also shows the same character.       (from ‘RG’.)

Shown below are the examples from both countries, for comparison…   (Top, RC (current),  centre, PRC,  bottom, RC historic)

(RC)(cd)_359_AK2012

Peoples' Rep. China diplomatic corps from

Peoples’ Rep. China diplomatic corps from 1970s/80s.     Brumby archive

Taiwan dip.1972-4 (RG plate)

Formosa/Taiwan dip.1972-4 (RG plate)

 

 

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Fancy a Chinese?

January 12, 2013

One of EU38 Pemberton’s rarest sightings is shown below – a  US Dodge from Chinese region 03 (or perhaps embassy 03?) with only four numbers, not five as expected via the para. x) in RPWO.       Thought  to have been taken 1947-1952, certainly in London.     The characters on the shield have been sent off for identification*.     Any thoughts, members?

The photographer, John Pemberton, notes that he believes the plate to be from Inner Mongolia…    RPWO gives 03 to have been for Nei Mongol (I.M.) from circa 1949-86.      We suspect that this photo is from about 1946, but it could actually be pre-war………

American Dodge sedan from postwar China.

American Dodge sedan from postwar China.

* A quick answer from  Yun Li in Hong  Kong today reads:

It depends on the context, the most common meaning can be
-messenger
-ambassador
-a certain title for soldiers / officer, used only in the past
 
The numbers below the character may be related to the context too. It reminds of something like a signpost in the old china, 1850-1900, or even older
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
So perhaps it IS a diplomatic series yet undiscovered?
(PRC2)_03-0524 cu_JPvb

Southern Africa historic

December 6, 2012

A fine collection of photos from former Nyasaland, Northern and Southern Rhodesia are to be found at this web-site link:

http://www.classiccarsinrhodesia.co.za/Makes/SWA.html

There are other African countries represented too, and gen on many interesting cars.   Some examples are here:

L=Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia in 1956.

L=Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia in 1956.

 

K 2440 is the Lusaka code in the former Northern Rhodesia which became Zambia upon independence in 1964.     Unknown car.  Pemberton archive

K 2440.   K was the Lusaka code in the former Northern Rhodesia which became Zambia upon independence in 1964. Unknown car. Pemberton archive.

 

RA 790.  A & RA = Belingwe & Shabani (now Mberengwa) in Zimbabwe.  Peugeot 404.

RA 790. A & RA = Belingwe & Shabani (now Mberengwa) in Southern Rhodesia-Zimbabwe.        Africa’s car – the Peugeot 404.

Morris Mini-Moke in police service, Southern Rhodesia 1960s.

G/T PW=Govt. Passenger car -Wee.     S. Rhodesia 1960.  Classiccarsinrhodesia archive

 

Southern Rhodesia registration 483, estimated 1905

Southern Rhodesia registration 483, estimated 1905

There is not much known of the numeric-only Rhodesian plates which the first vehicles used.    South Africa used identical plates at the time – note this Transvaal example below:

465 is a Transvaal issue 1900-1910 approx.

465 is a Transvaal issue, 1900-1910 approx.

And, from Western Australia:

Numeric-only WA 414

1900s numeric-only Western Australia’s  4140

It seems that many (Empire)  jurisdictions didn’t expect the expansion of motorcar populations, and thought a simple numeric format would suffice!

Evidence that Britain  also influenced early China plates is shown here:

China 1928, reg. 808

China 1928, reg. 808

Enjoy the Classic cars in Rhodesia website!   http://www.classiccarsinrhodesia.co.za/Makes/SWA.html


Chinese car spotted on fjord ferry in Norway

July 10, 2012

OLAV writes

July 2012

China is not the most likely country to be spotted in Europe. So you can imagine my surprise when I came across this Beijing registered vehicle on a local ferry in Norway this Sunday. The solo driver said he had left Beijing at the end of May. They were a group of 8 (vehicles or people I don’t know) that separated in Moscow because he wanted to go to the North Cape. The good news for British spotters is that they are all going to London for the Olympics. So keep your eyes open!